Buttock Injuries Information

Buttock Injuries Information

While the buttocks are often thought of as just an area to take a seat on, the strong muscles in the buttocks are highly involved in many leg and hip movements and can cause significant pain when injured.


 

 

Buttock Injuries

Anatomy Of The Buttocks

The buttocks are medically referred to as the gluteal region. It’s the area situated on the side and toward the posterior aspect of the bony pelvis and femur bone. Inferiorly, the buttocks meet the top of the thigh and groin area.

The bulk of the buttocks are predominately formed by a group of three muscles that are collectively called the gluteus muscles. These muscles are the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gluteus minimus. The large and strong gluteus maximus is the most superficial of the three muscles. It covers the hip joint and assists in powering a number of hip movements. The muscle fibers extend both downward and laterally, with part of the fibers ending in a thick lamina that inserts into the iliotibial band. Bursae are cushioning and lubricating sacs. There are three bursae separating the muscle or tendon from the vastus lateralis, greater trochanter and ischium. The gluteus medius muscle is partially covered by the gluteus maximus. It’s situated on the outer side of the pelvis. The gluteus medius muscle fibers eventually converge into a tendon that inserts on the lateral side of the greater trochanter. The fan-shaped gluteus minimus is the smaller of the three muscles. It’s situated directly beneath the gluteus medius. The fibers of the gluteus minimus eventually converge into a tendon that inserts into the greater trochanter. A bursa prevents friction from occurring between this tendon and the greater trochanter. The gluteus minimus and medius work together to abduct the thigh; prevent the pelvis from dropping; and, depending on whether the hip is flexed or extended, helps to internally and externally rotate the thigh. The gluteus muscles are superimposed by thick layers of fat. The intermediate intergluteal cleft separates the masses of muscle, thereby forming a right and left buttock. Other muscles and tendons in the gluteal region include - inferior and superior gemellus, obturator externus and internus, quadratus femoris, piriformis, and tensor fasciae latae

While the gluteal region is mostly composed of soft tissue, the lateral surface of the hip bone, sacrum, and upper end of the femur are considered the bones of the gluteal region.

There are several important nerves passing thorough the gluteal region, including the inferior and superior gluteal, sciatic, and posterior femoral cutaneous nerves.

What Causes Buttock Pain and Injury?

Pain in the buttocks may be the result of pain radiating from another area, such as commonly seen in sciatica, herniated discs, sacroiliac joint injury, and hip arthritis. However, the structures within the gluteal region can be directly injured from overuse, misuse, repetitive use, or trauma. These types of injuries are commonly seen during athletic over-training, direct hits during sporting activities, and everyday slip and fall incidences.

What Are Some Common Buttock Injuries?

Gluteal / Buttock Strain

Gluteal strains occur when one or more of the gluteal muscles and/or tendons become abnormally stretched or torn. Gluteal strains usually don’t occur during everyday activities. It’s far more common among athletes participating in running, hurdling, and jumping activities and in professional dancers. It usually occurs when the muscle or tendon is placed under more tension than the fibers can withstand, a fatigued or tight muscle suddenly and violently contracts, or the muscle suffers a direct blow. Strains are graded based on how bad the affected fibers are stretched or torn. A grade one strain involves stretching and microscopic tearing of the fibers. A grade two strain involves partial tearing of the muscle fibers. A grade three strain involves extensive to complete tearing of the fibers.

Gluteal Bursitis

Bursitis is inflammation of a bursa. In the gluteal region, the ischial bursa, which is the bursa between the pelvic bone and the gluteus maximus, is the most commonly affected. Since the ischiogluteal region is the area of the buttocks that contacts a seat when sitting, ischiogluteal bursitis is often caused from the bursa being compressed and irritated from frequent or prolonged sitting on hard surfaces. The bursitis may also occasionally occur after a direct trauma to the area near the bursa.

Buttock Muscle Contusion

A muscle contusion is a compressive injury caused by a blunt force trauma. The force of the trauma causes damage to the capillaries in the area. Blood is then free to seep into the gluteal muscles and other soft tissue. This is what causes the swelling and black-and-blue (bruising) to appear. Muscle contusions are often classified based on how deep the force penetrated. A grade one muscle contusion only effects the superficial muscle layers and causes mild localized pain, swelling, discoloration, and tenderness. A grade two muscle contusion involves slightly deeper muscle tissues and produces moderate localized pain, swelling, discoloration, and tenderness. A grade three muscle contusion involves a force that penetrates the deep intramuscular tissues. It can produce an obvious bulge in the muscle and cause severe pain, tenderness, swelling, and discoloration.
 

Strengthening Exercises

These Buttock Exercises are ideal to build strength and flexibility.

Massage Treatment

These Buttock Massage Techniques are of great value in pain relief; circulation stimulation; dispersing blood and fluid accumulations; swelling reduction; and relaxing muscle spasms, especially when used alongside the Sinew Therapeutics liniments, soaks and massage oil.

 

 

ACUTE STAGE SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT

 

This stage is characterized by swelling, redness, pain, and possibly a local sensation of heat, indicating inflammation. If coolness makes your pain feel better, then the Acute Stage Treatment is recommended.

 

ACUTE STAGE SYMPTOMS:

 

The acute stage starts the moment an injury occurs and lasts until the swelling and inflammation are gone. The swelling is the result of the blockage of blood, tissue fluids and circulation in the buttock because their normal movement has been disrupted by the force of the injury. Just like cars buttock up behind a traffic jam, causing congestion, exhaust and overheating; blood and fluids buttock up behind the injured buttock, causing pain, inflammation, lumps and swelling.

The sensation of heat is due to the warming action of the blood and fluids overheating in the injured buttock as they buttock up and accumulate. Stiffness and decreased mobility are due to spasms in tendons and ligaments that have contracted reflexively beyond their normal range from the impact of the injury.

As ligaments and tendons stretch and tear, blood from ruptured blood vessels becomes trapped in the local tissues. As the trapped blood clots up, it sticks the tissues together creating adhesions. Adhesions cause pain, inflammation and restricted movement because the layers of tissue that used to slide smoothly across one another now adhere and snap which interferes with normal functioning. It is essential to break up clotted blood as quickly as possible to prevent adhesions and scar tissue from forming.

During the acute stage it is very important to restore normal circulation to the buttock, break up clotted blood and stagnant fluids, reduce swelling, and reduce the redness and heat associated with inflammation. By restoring the flow of blood, fluids, and circulation in the buttock, then pain is relieved, damaged tissues can regenerate with healthy functional tissue, and the buttock can strengthen and regain it's mobility.

 

ACUTE STAGE TREATMENT:

 

1. Massage your buttock with Acute Sinew Liniment to relieve pain, reduce swelling and inflammation, break up clotted blood and stagnant fluids, and stimulate circulation of blood and fluids to help cells quickly repair damaged tissues. Sinew Herbal Ice can be used in-between applications.

2. The Sinew Sports Massage Oil is recommended for use before and after exercise, sports and strenuous activity. It warms and stimulates your muscles, increases circulation and relieves tightness, hence improving your performance and helping to prevent injury.

3. The Sinew Sports Massage Oil is recommended for use before and after exercise, sports and strenuous activity. It warms and stimulates your muscles, increases circulation and relieves tightness, hence improving your performance and helping to prevent injury.

 

 

CHRONIC STAGE SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT

 

This stage begins once the swelling and inflammation are gone, but you still feel pain, stiffness, weakness, and/or sensitivity in cold and damp weather. If heat makes your pain feel better, then the Chronic Stage Treatment is recommended.


CHRONIC STAGE SYMPTOMS:

 

The chronic stage begins once the swelling and inflammation are gone, but you still feel aching pain and stiffness. This is because there are still accumulations of stagnant blood and fluids in your buttock that are blocking circulation and blood supply to damaged tissues, creating residual pain, stiffness and weakness. You may actually feel hard nodules like sand in the tissue, indicating accumulation, calcification, and adhesions, which all cause pain, stiffness, and joint instability.

Your buttock may feel more sensitive to the cold and ache in cold and damp weather due to impaired circulation. When you move your buttock you may hear a clicking or popping sound from the tendons and ligaments slipping very slightly in and out of their natural alignment indicating weakness and joint instability, causing chronic pain and a cycle of reinjury. These symptoms are often the result of failure to treat the injury properly from the outset and overicing.

Increasing circulation and blood supply to the damaged tissues is very important in treating chronic injuries because tendons and ligaments do not have an extensive direct supply of blood. That is why chronic injuries can be slow to heal. Increasing local circulation also prevents cold and dampness from penetrating the injured area, preventing pain and stiffness.

During the chronic stage it is very important to break up remaining accumulations of blood and fluids, and increase circulation and blood supply to the damaged tissues. By increasing circulation and blood flow in the buttock, then pain and stiffness is relieved, and the tendons and ligaments can strengthen to restore stability.


CHRONIC STAGE TREATMENT:

 

1. Massage your buttock with Chronic Sinew Liniment to relieve pain and stiffness, strongly stimulate circulation and blood flow to damaged tissues, and promote the healing of overstretched tendons and ligaments. The Sinew Relaxing Soak can be used in-between applications.

2. Soak your buttock with the Sinew Relaxing Soak to relax muscles and tendons that are in spasm, ease joint pain and stiffness, and improve range of motion. The Sinew Relaxing Soak is particularly useful if you feel restricted mobility in your buttock. The soak can be used by saturating a towel in the liquid and applying it to your buttock. Chronic Sinew Liniment can be used in-between applications.

3. The Sinew Sports Massage Oil is recommended for use before and after exercise, sports and strenuous activity. It warms and stimulates your muscles, increases circulation and relieves tightness, hence improving your performance and helping to prevent injury.